1. Health
Send to a Friend via Email
Paige Waehner

5 Reasons You Can't Stick to Exercise

By June 20, 2012

Follow me on:

"I don't have any problem working out," one of my clients said to me one day, "It's just the fact that I have to keep doing it over and over and over. I mean, what's up with that?"

It's true that exercise, like brushing your teeth, is something you have to keep doing if you really want to lose weight, maintain your weight and/or avoid that dreaded starting-all-over feeling that comes when you've missed more than a week of exercise.

There are a number of reasons we find it hard to stay committed to exercise and I've put together the most common in my latest article, 5 Reasons You Can't Stick to Exercise. If your workouts are too hard or, worse, you don't even like your workouts, how motivated are you to keep doing them?

That's just one question to ask yourself if you're struggling and, if you've experienced this, please leave a comment and tell us about your commitment to exercise. Do you find it hard to stick to an exercise program for the long term? If so, what's standing in your way? Leave a comment and tell us about it.

Comments
June 20, 2012 at 3:59 pm
(1) K H says:

My obsticals to long term excercise are illness and injuries. Two years ago I fell off a ladder and fractured my knee and buttbone. Last year I got sick and the infection spread to my kidneys. I myself get weird during long healing periods and start eating too much of the bad stuff and gain some weight. As if getting back into shape wasn’t going to be hard enough.

June 21, 2012 at 2:47 pm
(2) Chris says:

Hi there, i think most people feel that the pain of exercise is greater than the joys of sitting around eating junk & watching TV. If only they knew how good they’d feel by the endorphins the body releases through exercise. The beginning might be tough but the rewards lead to a naturally happier life. People should focus on the benefits of exercise and will therefore be motivated. Benefits suchas happier, more energy, release stress, handle stress, slimmer, healthier. Thanks for the post. Chris

June 23, 2012 at 1:39 am
(3) vern says:

I can’t stay motivated and I need some one to work out with. Doing it alone doesn’t mptivate me/

June 25, 2012 at 1:58 pm
(4) Andrew says:

The hardest thing to do is start. Then, the hardest thing to do is being consistent with a regular exercise program. I do hard (and very easy) workouts based on those things that I enjoy. I cycle,run, compete (mostly against myself) in local events and this becomes like the payoff for all the work. One of my main ideas is that there should be EASY workouts and HARD workouts with a bunch of aerobic days and definite rest days. As I am older, I try to limit hard workouts to 2-3 times max, per week, depending on how my week is going. Then I concentrate on easy workouts being easy the rest of the week . It seems to help everything from getting stale. I love running and cycling and seldom wear mp3 players because this is my opportunity to do something and be somewhere different.

June 25, 2012 at 5:33 pm
(5) Di says:

I simply don’t like working out. I just completed a 16-week training program where I worked out 4 days/week under the supervision of a trainer (on alternate days).
Yes – I lost weight
Yes – I am in better shape
Yes – My ‘vitals’ are improved.

The problem is I HATED every minute of it.
No endorphin rushes (even after 4 months)
No “I feel awesome after working out”
No “I can’t get going without working out”

I had no pain or injuries and I was working out at the level set by the training & hitting my target cardio rate everyday.
Nonetheless, I loathed every second and I couldn’t wait for the program to end.
I was hoping that (after 4 months) it would become a habit, but nope, I still hate every second of working out.

June 25, 2012 at 5:48 pm
(6) rorbus says:

Priorities and goals. When I was growing up, you excercised and dieted to loose weight. Once you lost the weight and met your goals, you went back to the way you were – maybe with a few modifications. Today, things are different and I really try to keep to a routine, but once you are at a ‘good’ weight, it is very easy to say, well today I need to do x instead of workout because I have not done x is a long time and it really needs to be done. Doesn’t matter what x is, but it is now the priority. We (I) have too many things going on in life and it is just too say the excerise routine is no longer the highest priority. I think it also helps to continuously set new goals – running distance and speed goals help me.

June 25, 2012 at 5:49 pm
(7) Ronit says:

Hi Di,

Kudos for your discipline, but sorry that you didn’t enjoy your 4 months of training. It makes sense that it didn’t become a habit since you didn’t enjoy the experience. I’d suggest that you and others might want to explore some kind of exercise that you might like better – maybe the last one was too structured. Maybe throw away the discipline and find something you like – even if it’s going for a walk outdoors.

June 25, 2012 at 6:20 pm
(8) Jen says:

For most people, the hard part is getting the whole “fitness thing” started… once you are hooked on the feel good aspect of living a healthy fit lifestyle the only challenge is quelling the boredom factor. I believe in a mind, body, spirit connection.. Your inner being has to subscribe to your conscious effort to being fit… then your mind signals the body to do what it needs to do in effort to physically make that happen…
Switch it up every 6-8 weeks! Take a cardio kickboxing class, a spin class, bootcamp, crossfit, join a running club, swim club.. sign up for a race or fitness challenge… so you have a short term goal. Something to get excited about! You won’t only FIX the boredom factor… you body will respond and shape even faster :) Need home workout ideas or some added motivation? Please “like” my FB page.. Jens Daily Grind

June 25, 2012 at 6:20 pm
(9) Jen says:

For most people, the hard part is getting the whole “fitness thing” started… once you are hooked on the feel good aspect of living a healthy fit lifestyle the only challenge is quelling the boredom factor. I believe in a mind, body, spirit connection.. Your inner being has to subscribe to your conscious effort to being fit… then your mind signals the body to do what it needs to do in effort to physically make that happen…
Switch it up every 6-8 weeks! Take a cardio kickboxing class, a spin class, bootcamp, crossfit, join a running club, swim club.. sign up for a race or fitness challenge… so you have a short term goal. Something to get excited about! You won’t only FIX the boredom factor… you body will respond and shape even faster :) Need home workout ideas or some added motivation? Please “like” my FB page.. Jens Daily Grind

June 25, 2012 at 8:07 pm
(10) bOO7 says:

I’m almost the same as KH . Had 4 Joint replacements and gained weight. WHAT kind of exercises can I do to Burn off these extra lbs.

June 27, 2012 at 9:13 am
(11) Deidre Henning says:

I have also tried to do workouts just to see myself doing less and less of the workouts till it came to a stand still, Then I hit the right key for me. I am doing mostly 3 x per week 30 minutes of aerobics burst with weight training in between with 6 min stretching.Rule 1- I have and idea that it is like brushing my teeth. Not something that I can talk myself out off and Rule 2: I feel wonderful and fresh and energies after workout- I tell myself how I like it and how lovely I feel when leaving. ( previous work-out where to long and took to much out of me leaving me drained) I have kept it going for 3 and 1/2 year now and miss it if I can not get to it. I also walk often 5km at a brisk rate.

June 28, 2012 at 3:24 am
(12) Gina says:

At first, i’m really struggling doing my workouts and exercises… to think that most people in the gym are male … overtime… i enjoyed my workout especially when i did hard … plus i have made friends male and female as well … as of this moment, i’m not struggling anymore… there is a feeling of joy everytime i go to the gym & did a workout, or attending aerobics classes, and even exercising in the home … there is fun in working out!

June 28, 2012 at 6:42 pm
(13) Ginger Tansil says:

I’m just coming off an exercise hyatis!!! I feel terribly guilty, but I’m just climbing back in the saddle and get back into the swing of it and try to figure out how not to fall off the wagon again. It started with missing a day, then 2 then a week then the second week. The third week I had to go out of town…. I’m back now. I HAVE to get back on the wagon because I volunteered to teach exercise at my church. Plus my insurance company is going to increase our (my husband’s and my) payments if we don’t get below 30 BMI. I’m not sure how to phrase this. I’m trying to learn to swim without paying a high cost of a swim instructor. I love walking, but I’ve abused my knees and right ankle from hours and hours of walking in the past. I’ve got to replace it with swimming and maybe get in a walk, once a week or so. Put my headphones on and just enjoy myself.

July 29, 2012 at 10:30 am
(14) Charles says:

I used to workout every other day, sometimes 3 days a week, and sometimes 6 days a week until I began messing around the wrong kind of folks in my neighborhood and became cross-addicted to drugs and alcohol. That’s my only excuse for not going to the gym or fitness center. I had to do something about the mess that I was in or die on some street corner or in some flop house.
I ordered $2,000.00 worth of vitamins, powders, pills, you name I had it.
Every day these things stared at me and I stared back at them.
The supplements were my ticket out of hell and I’ve been on that train for six months now and I’m not getting off!

December 24, 2012 at 4:46 pm
(15) C E Mangum says:

Other things conflict with my exercise time. I think the main reason is that I have been pushing myself more than I should be.

December 24, 2012 at 4:59 pm
(16) Dee says:

I have a hard time getting motivated, but one I get going I’m ok. Here’s the kicker once I see result I stop and can’t get motivated again for awhile.

December 26, 2012 at 6:06 am
(17) Ann says:

When we write whether we “enjoyed” a workout, we’re often talking about the exercise was pleasurable, in an emotional sense.

But, there other ways we can “enjoy” repeated, harsh workout routines and that is if we find such routines intellectually satisfying. Is it not better to know after a months of daily rigor that we might not, if we continue on diets and exercise, that we won’t suffer from cardiac and other diseases that would probably occur if we didn’t endure the rigors of self-discipline to exercise?

I think after a while, however long, longer for some than others, intellectual satisfaction will translate into emotional enjoyment. Well it does for me

Leave a Comment

Line and paragraph breaks are automatic. Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title="">, <b>, <i>, <strike>
Top Related Searches

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.

We comply with the HONcode standard
for trustworthy health
information: verify here.